Cardboard Wars

War is the continuation of politics by other means

The Damned Die Hard Teaser


For those who have never seen The Damned Die Hard, here are the maps in all their Glory (pardon the pun).

I just got a new phone that takes awesome pictures. I will be experimenting with how to best take the pictures, but first it looks like I need to straighten the map in a few places!

As I start to make plans for the Japanese invasion, more photos will be taken with the counters. I’ve set up the American/Filipino ground units so far, and it doesn’t look like there is a lot to stop the Japanese.

The final photo is a separate map of the Bataan Peninsula, for use with a separate scenario.

A bit of map legend: the icons that look like slotted screws are actually airstrips. There are two kinds: black & white. The black ones exist at the time of the Japanese invasion, the white ones are for use with Return to the Philippines, and do not exist in this game. Before anyone asks, Clarke Field is not an airstrip, but there is an airbase counter that goes there in addition to the printed airstrip.

There are also a number of ports shown on the maps. There are five types of ports that we are concerned with: Great, major, standard, minor and marginal. Different symbols denote the different ports. However, note the ports that are denoted with just an anchor symbol. These are anchorages, which I guess means that ships can anchor there (like seaplane tenders), but it is useless as a port, and has no effect as a port, or even tracing supply out of it, as far as I can tell.

As such, these hexes do not have to be defended, because they don’t do the Japanese any good. We are concerned with defending the other ports where supplies can be landed.

I don’t have the terrain key here, but I think the dotted lines are roads, and the white dots are trails.

Also, jungle is very prevalent here, and it is pretty easy to figure out where the jungles are. This is an area where the Japanese have an advantage over the Americans.

I just noticed that Manila is cut off at the bottom of the first photo. Manila is a full hex city, a major port, and it has an airfield in it.

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The island of Luzon (click image to enlarge)

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The central Philippine islands; Corregidor is at the extreme top of the map, and the island in the north is the southern end of Luzon (click image to enlarge)

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The island of Mindanao and Malaysia [Borneo] (southwest corner)

The Bataan Peninsula (click image to enlarge)

The Bataan Peninsula (click image to enlarge)

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5 thoughts on “The Damned Die Hard Teaser

  1. 29delta on said:

    Thanks for this. Is this a game with multiple Sea Phases per turn?

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    • The naval rules seem to be pretty similar to the Europa standard rules, 30 MP per sub-phase, 5 sub-phases per turn, and naval movement in both the movement and exploitation phases. Right now I am skimming through the rules trying to spot obvious differences. I can tell already that I am going to be doing a lot of rulebook flipping as I’m getting started. =)

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    • As I get further through the rules, there are a total of 10 naval sub phases, as I said. However, it looks like each naval unit has only 4 MPs per phase. Movement is not per hex, but per sea boxes drawn on the map. If you look at the seas on the photos of the maps, you may be able to see the gray outlines of the boxes that divide the seas up.

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  2. 29delta on said:

    It’ll be interesting to see is the Sea rules bog this game down so much it’s not worth the playing. I have no idea.

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    • There’s really no getting around naval rules considering that the Japanese have to reach the islands somehow! I’ve never felt that the naval rules bogged down any game. I’ve played around with Second Front enough that I have a somewhat decent understanding of them. The problem is that they are so intricate that it takes time to learn. =) Having said that, we’ll see how it works out.

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