Cardboard Wars

War is the continuation of politics by other means

TDDH: Jan IV 42: The Japanese


I have not been able to get to this for a while. I have had a bunch of stuff pushed onto my stack, and it has taken a bit to pop each one of them off of it.

By the end of the last Allied turn, the Allies managed to re-establish contact with Manila and reopen a supply line. Even though the line is open, the units that started the last turn out of supply are still out of supply this turn.

However, opening the supply line may have put the Allied forces in a worse position. The Filipino 1st infantry division is in a wooded rough hex (-2 DRM, a decent enough defensive modifier), but because their supporting artillery can’t make it through the jungle, this division is unsupported. This means that the defensive rating of the division (9-11-5) is halved, giving the division a defensive rating of 5.5.

The AF Naval Group making its way towards Manila has also been left in a precarious position. While Japanese bombers were unsuccessful on their strike missions against the naval group, they are still within striking distance of not just the same aircraft, but the Imperial Japanese Navy ships left behind. While not a large group (they are mostly flotillas of smaller ships. All the cruisers, carriers and destroyers have been called away). The Japanese ships cannot take on the Pensacola, unless they can close to torpedo range. Then they can cause chaos with the US Navy.

The War Elsewhere

The war thus far..... (click image to enlarge)

The war thus far….. (click image to enlarge)

The Japanese army continues to make magnificent gains elsewhere in China and the southwest Pacific. The island of Borneo is overrun (now Malaysia/Indonesia). The order of battle says that the NW Borneo box is captured by the Japanese this turn, however, there is no NW Borneo box. I am assuming that this is supposed to be the NE Borneo box, and I have marked the holding boxes as such.

What these gains do is establish a blockade of the Philippines.

So what does this mean for the Allies?

No more American reinforcements can arrive from Australia.

However, it does not mean that the Allied supply sources suddenly dry up, just the reinforcements.

Initial Phase

Weather Roll

The weather once again stays the same, except the seas of Zone 12 return to stormy.

  • Zone 11: Clear weather/Calm Seas
  • Zone 12: Mud weather/Stormy seas
  • Zone 13: Rainy weather/Calm seas

All units, except for the three Allied stacks denoted as being out of supply, are in supply. The southern Japanese forces are in supply through the ports of Lucena/Batangas, and the northern Japanese forces are in supply through the port of Olongapo. The Japanese baseforce unit at Olongapo is flipped to its immobile side to increase the port capacity of Olongapo.

The Japanese also receive no reinforcements this turn, but several ground units and naval units are withdrawn, including the 48th division.

Movement Phase

First Naval Movement Sub-Phase

The IJN approaches the USN fleet (click image to enlarge)

The IJN approaches the USN fleet (click image to enlarge)

There is no attack supply available on the western side of Luzon, while there are four resource points available at Lucena. In order to provide attack supply for the northern/western wing of the attack force, two resource points are loaded onto transports at Lucena, and sent to Olongapo.

Meanwhile, the IJN sends all available warships in pursuit of the approaching USN transport group. Upon entering the Corregidor sea box, the USN rolls for reaction, and detects the approaching Japanese navy. They flee one sea box towards Panay. They can only move the single sea box, because they are low on fuel (Note to the Allied commander: Do not leave ships in open waters at the end of a turn. Make sure they are in a port somewhere).

Because the USN is not able to escape, the IJN approaches and makes contact with the USN, at night.

The Japanese tactic catches the USN completely off guard, and the IJN is not discovered until they have approached to torpedo range……

The Battle of the China Sea:

Round 1: Torpedo range (gunnery fire and torpedo fire occurs simultaneously):

Prior to any combat, all torpedo attacks are declared:

  • Tomo-1 (IJN – Tomozuro class torpedo boats) vs. Merchant-1 (USN): miss
  • Waka-1 (IJN – Wakatake class destroyers) vs. Merchant-2 (USN): hit; 1 damage, 131r & 148r artillery battalions sunk
  • Kuma (IJN – Kuma class cruiser) vs. Merchant-3 (USN): miss
  • PT-1 (USN) vs. Waka-1 (IJN): miss

Gunnery:

  • USS Pensacola (USN) vs. Waka-1 (IJN): miss
  • Maru-1 (IJN – seaplane tender, minelayer, survey ship (???)) vs. IP-1 (USN): hit; 1 damage, IP-1 sunk
  • IP-1 (USN – inshore patrol) vs. Maru-1 (IJN) : miss

The USN attempts to withdraw, while the IJN maintains the distance. Range opens to destroyer range.

Round 2: Destroyer range (gunnery fire first, then torpedo fire):

Gunnery:

  • USS Pensacola (USN) vs. Waka-1 (IJN): because it attempted to withdraw, it cannot hit the target
  • Maru-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-4 (USN): miss

Torpedo attacks:

  • Tomo-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-1 (USN): hit, 1 damage, ‘ A’ transport counter sunk
  • Waka-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-2 (USN): hit; 1 damage, sunk, along with US 478th artillery regiment
  • Kuma (IJN) vs. Merchant-3 (USN): miss
  • PT-1 (USN) vs. Waka-1 (IJN): can’t hit a target, because it had attempted a withdrawal.

The IJN attempts to close range, while the USN continues to attempt to withdraw. The IJN has the speed advantage, giving it a -2 DRM to range determination. The range closes to torpedo range.

Round 3: Torpedo range (gunnery fire and torpedo fire occurs simultaneously):

Gunnery:

  • USS Pensacola (USN) vs. Waka-1 (IJN): because it attempted to withdraw, it cannot hit the target
  • Maru-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-4 (USN): miss

Torpedo attacks:

  • Tomo-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-1 (USN): hit, 2 damage & sunk, armor replacement point sunk
  • Waka-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-4 (USN): miss
  • Kuma (IJN) vs. Merchant-3 (USN): hit, 3 damage & sunk. 1 resource point is sunk.
  • PT-1 (USN) vs. Waka-1 (IJN): can’t hit a target, because it had attempted a withdrawal.

At this point, the USN realizes it can’t escape, and decides to stand and fight. Both sides elect to maintain range, and fight on.

Round 4: Torpedo Range (gunnery fire and torpedo fire occurs simultaneously):

Gunnery:

  • USS Pensacola (USN) vs. Waka-1 (IJN): miss
  • Maru-1 (IJN) vs. PT-1 (USN): miss

Torpedo attacks:

  • Tomo-1 (IJN) vs. Pensacola (USN): miss
  • Waka-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-4 (USN): miss
  • Kuma (IJN) vs. Merchant-3 (USN): can’t hit, strike number too high
  • PT-1 (USN) vs. Kuma (IJN): hit, 3 damage, Kuma sunk

Both sides again choose to maintain range. The USN can’t escape. Range stays at torpedo.

Round 5: Torpedo range (gunnery fire and torpedo fire occurs simultaneously):

Gunnery:

  • USS Pensacola (USN) vs. Maru (IJN): miss
  • Maru-1 (IJN) vs. PT-1 (USN): miss

Torpedo attacks:

  • Tomo-1 (IJN) vs. Merchant-4 (USN): hit, 3 damage, Merchant-4 sunk, 2 resource points sunk
  • Waka-1 (IJN) vs. Pensacola (USN): miss
  • PT-1 (USN) vs. Tomo-1 (IJN): miss

Sadly, now the USN has the speed advantage and the remnants can escape. The IJN attempts to maintain range, but the USN attempts to withdraw, using the -2 DRM to do so.

Range opens to destroyer range.

Round 6: Destroyer range (gunnery fire first, then torpedo fire):

Gunnery:

  • USS Pensacola (USN) vs. Maru (IJN): miss
  • Maru-1 (IJN) vs. PT-1 (USN): miss

Torpedo attacks:

  • Tomo-1 (IJN) vs. Pensacola (USN): miss
  • Waka-1 (IJN) vs. Pensacola (USN): miss
  • PT-1 (USN) vs. Tomo-1 (IJN): miss

The USN continues to attempt escape, while the IJN attempts to close.

Range opens to Cruiser

Round 7: Cruiser range (gunnery fire by cruisers only):

Gunnery:

  • USS Pensacola (USN) vs. Maru (IJN): miss

The USN withdraws, the IJN attempts to close.

Range opens to battleship range. All naval units are out of range.

Because there is no exchange of gunfire, the USN once again attempts escape, and the IJN attempts to close.

The USN escapes after diaster (click image to enlarge)

The USN escapes after diaster (click image to enlarge)

The USN finally escapes.

Although the Pensacola escaped without damage (and the pesky torpedo boats managed to survive), the sinking of all four transports and their cargo is a great victory for the empire. Night combat gives a certain advantage to the IJN, and the remaining ships could pursue the limping American fleet, but the mission has been completed. The naval group returns to Lucena.

The transports make Olangapo unmolested (Note: As the Allied commander, I forgot to move the aircraft based on Mindanao, the Devastators, to Luzon, since Japanese fighter cover has been reduced. Note to self, get those aircraft to Manila, ASAP!). There they unload a pair of resource points, then return to Lucena.

Movement

20141126_170421

Japanese movement, Jan IV 42 (click image to enlarge)

The Japanese continue the push on Manila from both the north and the south. They arrive on the outskirts of Malolos, threatening not only that town, but the Filipino 1st infantry division as well.

Since the infantry had to abandon its artillery, the 1st is unsupported, meaning that the defense strength is halved (5.5 DF). Supply at this moment does not factor in. Malolos also has a defense strength of 6, but does not have the negative DRM associated with the wooded rough that the 1st division occupies.

The decision is made to attack Malolos.

Combat Phase

Japanese post-combat positions (click image to enlarge)

Japanese post-combat positions (click image to enlarge)

As soon as the attack on Malolos is declared, the Army Air Corps gets bombers in the air. The B-18s stationed at Malolos take to the air, and since the target hex is the hex they took off from, they qualify to carry a larger bomb load, increasing their bombing strength to 1.5. The Japanese respond by sending a pair of bombers for ground support (2 bombing factors).

No matter how the Japanese try to find one more attack factor, they end up with 34 to the Allies 7, a 4.8:1.

The Japanese roll a 2, an HX (half exchange). Even though the Allies lose the battle, they accounted well for themselves, whittling the Japanese force even further. The Japanese lose 6 attack factors. That’s going to hurt. The Japanese lose their tank battalion, an artillery battalion and a static brigade.

Special replacements: IJA: 1.75, Allies, 1.25 American, and 2 Filipino.

After combat, the Japanese push into Malolos, completely cutting Manila off from the rest of the Allied forces, while the B-18s land at Manila.

Exploitation Phase

Naval Movement Subphase

Running battle between IJN and the Pensacola (click image to enlarge)

Running battle between IJN and the Pensacola (click image to enlarge)

Having returned to port and replenished, the IJN considers whether or not to pursue the remnants of the USN. If they can successfully sneak up on the Pensacola at night, they may be able to sink her.

The IJN leaves Lucena, in pursuit of the Pensacola, moving two sea boxes in full daylight before switching to night movement. The Pensacola, however, detects the IJN and withdraws, leaving the sea box empty as the IJN arrives.

The IJN does not give up, however. They continue pursuit, and engage the Pensacola twice at battleship range, allowing the Pensacola to escape. The third engagement is at cruiser range, allowing the Pensacola to fire on the Maru-1, sinking it with 2 hits of damage. In the confusion, the Pensacola escapes once again and puts into port at Zamboanga.

The IJN returns to Lucena to replenish.

There is no ground movement during the exploitation phase.

 

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8 thoughts on “TDDH: Jan IV 42: The Japanese

  1. Hi, I’ve not been paying close attention to every one of your posts, but some things caught my eye today.

    1. The Japanese taking over off-map boxes: I agree with your switch to the NE Borneo box. I’m surprised we never noticed that one before.

    2. This has me confused: “Even though the line is open, the units that started the last turn out of supply are still out of supply this turn.” Units are only OoS for the player turn they are judged OoS.

    3. Last Allied turn, was the 1st Philippine ID a 12-6 before it broke down and advanced over the mountains into the jungle? If so, it could have kept its artillery with it, the movement prohibitions do not force a unit to break down.

    4. Naval combats: That’s a lot of torpedoing going on. I draw your attention to Rule 34B2, Torpedo Depletion. The Japanese ships would have been depleted after the 2nd torpedo attack, the American PTs after one.

    This has been a fun game to watch, I wish I had been paying closer attention before this.

    Like

    • 2. Supply:

      Rule 12B: Both sides check the general supply status of their units during the initial phase of each player turn.

      Rule 12D2: Out of general supply: A turn out of general supply consists of two consecutive player turns. Example: An Allied unit is first judged to be out of general supply in th einitial phase of the Jan I 42 first player turn, and remains out of supply thereafter. Its first turn out of supply consists of the Allied Jan I 42 turn and the Japanese Jan II 42 turn.

      3. The 1st Filipino infantry division (9-11-6), not the US Philippines division (12-6) crossed as an unsupported division. It was stacked with a 3-6 artillery regiment that was not part of the division. It had to be left behind as it was a separate unit.

      4. I completely missed that. I do review the rules, especially the naval rules as I go, but still miss stuff. Thanks for pointing that out. I’ll fix that.

      Like

  2. I wondered about the torps myself 🙂

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    • I review the rules, especially the naval rules. I really do, but some of them are so scattered that I don’t find them when I need them. It’s easier (for me) to play another opponent so they can point out when I miss something. I can fix this (I think).

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    • Lee Hanna, Glory Rules Judge on said:

      re: 2. Ah, I see. The example in 12D2 is meant to show that when counting how many turns out of supply, you count complete turns, not player turns, for U-status. The first sentence is only to establish the conditions for the example. If that unit in the example had gotten back into supply after only one player turn OoS, it would be back in supply. There should be no delay in a change of supply status.

      3. I see, I read too much into the possessive its.

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      • Let me make sure I am understanding what you are saying. Last turn, the Allies re-established contact with Manila. As of this turn, they should be back in supply (removing the u-1 markers).

        The supply rules are something that I often struggle with, no matter what game. It would not surprise me in the leasat that I am misinterpreting.

        The change in supply status would not affect this turn, as I decided not to attack the out of supply units. As of the beginning of the next turn, they will be out of supply again, but they will have full movement and defense. That could affect some things coming up.

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        • Right, as Manila is still a supply source, the U-1 markers should have gone away in the Japanese initial phase, and now they will go right back in the next Allied initial phase, starting the turn count again.

          Like

  3. Stephen on said:

    Cracking campaign – really enjoying the unfolding drama.

    Like

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